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Khamis, 15 Disember 2011

Listening activity - audacity to MP3

Click here to listen to the story! 

http://www.mediafire.com/?nvbjkhvg22cdqib

The Elephant's Nose

 
There was a time, when the elephant's nose was no bigger than a boot that he could wriggle from side to side. But an elephant's child changed all that.
He was a curious fellow who asked ever so many questions.
He asked the ostrich why her tail feathers grew just so.
He asked the giraffe what made his skin spotty.
He asked the hippo why his eyes were red, and the baboonwhy melons tasted as they did.
"What does a crocodile have for dinner?" he asked one day.
"Shushh" said all the animals in a scared voice.
But he would not shushh.
By and by he met the Kolokolo bird. She told him where he could find an answer.
"Go to the grey, green, greasy Limpopo river," said she.
So off he went, carrying a load of bananas and sugarcane and melons. He'd be hungry on the way, you see.
After a week of trudging and budging he reached where he had to reach.
At the edge of the river he stepped on what he thought was a log of wood. It winked one eye.
"Excuse me, but have you seen a crocodile in these parts?" asked the elephant's child politely.
The creature winked the other eye and half lifted his tail out of the mud.
"I am the crocodile," he said.
The elephant's child grew excited and kneeled down.
"I have been looking for you all these days," he said. "Will you please tell me what you have for dinner."
SPLATH! Went the crocodile's tail back into the oozy mud.
"Come nearer little one, come nearer and I'll whisper," said the crocodile.
The Elephant's  Nose, Folktales for kids: 68_1.gif
The elephant's child put his head down close to the crocodile's musky tusky mouth.
And the crocodile caught him by his little nose.
The elephant's child knew he was in BIG trouble. He sat back on his haunches. And he pulled and pulled.
The crocodile splashed in the water and pulled and pulled.
They both pulled and pulled. And the elephant's nose kept stretching and stretching. At last the crocodile let go.
Bfuddudd!! Fell the elephant, right on his big broad back.
He looked at his nose. He could not see where it ended! It was loooong! So long, he could swish it around. But it hurt him awfully.
So he wrapped the nose in cool banana leaves and waited for it to shrink.
He waited and waited. But nothing happened. He could still swish it all around.
And so it remains to this day.
LooooooonG!

Sabtu, 26 November 2011

WEB BASED LESSON PLAN

LEVEL: Form 4 (Intermediate)
TOPIC: Wildlife Warriors - People with the Law of Attraction
THEME: Environment
TIME: 1 Hour 20 Minutes (2 periods)
LANGUAGE CONTENT: Present Perfect Tense/Present Perfect Continuous Tense

AIMS: By the end of the lesson, students should be able to:
i.        Practice informational skills by searching relevant information from the World Wide Web and transfer them into the worksheet.
ii.      Practice the usage of Present Perfect Tense/Present Perfect Continuous Tense
iii.    Practice their writing skills by producing sentences and questions using Present Perfect Tense/Present Perfect Continuous Tense

            EDUCATIONAL EMPHASIS: Thinking skills, ICT skills & Multiple Intelligences
TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS: One computer for two students, internet connection, and web browser.
PREVIOUS KNOWLEDGE: Students have learnt Present Perfect Tense/Present Perfect Continuous Tense and how to obtain information on the World Wide Web.

PREPARATION:
i.                    Locate the video from You Tube on Present Perfect Tense/Present Perfect Continuous Tense, the article of Tan Sri Syed Mokhtar Al-Bukhary, the news on important incident.
ii.                  Browse through the websites to make sure they all are suitable for students and match the topic.
iii.                Prepare worksheets based on the information from the websites.

PROCEDURE:

Set induction: (10 minutes)
1.      Teacher recalls what has been learned previously on Present Perfect Tense/ Present Perfect Continuous.
2.      Teacher introduces the topic of the day.
3.      Teacher shows several pictures of important incidents around the world.
4.      Teacher prompts students by asking several questions.

Development: (60 minutes)
Activity 1: ‘Additional Information’ (20 minutes)
1.      Teacher instructs students to form a group of 2 to 3 per computer.
2.      Teacher instructs students to open the following website. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EHARoD1remo
3.      Teacher asks students to watch the video attentively and understand the lesson
4.      Teacher gives 10 minutes for the students to extract out the information on the Formulation, Usage and Common Mistakes from the video.

Activity 2: ‘Important incident around the world’ (30 minutes)
1.      Teacher distributes worksheet 1 & 2 to the class
2.      Teacher instructs students to open the following website:

3.      Teacher instructs students to read the news article and identify the Present Perfect Tenses as many as they can
4.      Teacher then instructs students to write them down in Worksheet 1
5.      Teacher instructs students to also identify 10 Simple Past Tense from the article and change them into Present Perfect Tense Continuous in Worksheet 2



Activity 3: ‘Successful person around the world’ (15 minutes)
1.      Teacher distributes worksheet 3 to the class.
2.      Teacher asks students to open the following websites

3.      Teacher asks students to form question cues on Tan Sri Syed Mokhtar al-Bukhary’s story life in the worksheet given. Students are advised to use the present perfect continuous when asking about the duration of an activity. 



      Conclusion: (5 minutes)
1.      Teacher recaps the whole lesson.
2.      Teacher highlights the moral values that students should learn through the lesson.

FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITY:
1.      Students have to exchange their formed questions with other groups and provide answers for the questions.
2.      Students need to send their questions and answers to the teacher via e-mail before the next class.
  
 Worksheet 1 ‘Important incident around the world’ (15 minutes)
Present Perfect tenses            
                                               
1)      ……………………………………………………………………………
2)      ……………………………………………………………………………
3)      ……………………………………………………………………………
4)      ……………………………………………………………………………
5)      ……………………………………………………………………………















Worksheet 2 ‘Important incident around the world’
(15 minutes)
Simple Past Tense
Present Perfect Tense Continuous

1) …………………………………….                         ………………………………………
2) …………………………………….                         ………………………………………
3) …………………………………….                         ………………………………………
4) …………………………………….                         ………………………………………
5) …………………………………….                         ………………………………………
6) …………………………………….                         ………………………………………
7) …………………………………….                         ………………………………………
8) …………………………………….                         ………………………………………
9) …………………………………….                         ………………………………………
10) …………………………………….                       ………………………………………






Worksheet 3 ‘Successful person around the world’ (15 minutes)

Form as many questions as you can about Tan Sri Syed Mokhtar Al-Bukhary’ story life using Past Perfect Tense. You are advised to use the present perfect continuous when asking about the duration of an activity. Below is an example given to help you.

Example: How long have he been devoting his life towards helping the unfortunate?
1)      ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

2)      ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………


3)      ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

4)      ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………


5)      ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

6)      ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………


7)      ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

8)      ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………





Picture for Set Induction

 The websites

Activity 1




Activity 2



Activity 3

Worksheet 1

 Worksheet 2




Worksheet 3






 

Khamis, 17 November 2011

Gamelan and its wonder



A gamelan is a musical ensemble from Indonesia, typically from the islands of Bali or Java, featuring a variety of instruments such as metallophones(video), xylophones, drums and gongs; bamboo flutes, bowed and plucked strings. Vocalists may also be included.

The term refers more to the set of instruments than to the players of those instruments. A gamelan is a set of instruments as a distinct entity, built and tuned to stay together – instruments from different gamelan are generally not interchangeable.
The word gamelan comes from the Javanese word gamels, meaning "to strike or hammer", and the suffix an, which makes the root a collective noun.



History of Gamelan

The gamelan predates the Hindu-Buddhist culture that dominated Indonesia in its earliest records and instead represents a native art form. The instruments developed into their current form during the Majapahit Empire.[1] In contrast to the heavy Indian influence in other art forms, the only obvious Indian influence in gamelan music is in the Javanese style of singing.[2] In Javanese mythology, the gamelan was created by Sang Hyang Guru in Saka era 167 (c. AD 230), the god who ruled as king of all Java from a palace on the Maendra mountains in Medangkamulan (now Mount Lawu). He needed a signal to summon the gods and thus invented the gong. For more complex messages, he invented two other Gongs, thus forming the original gamelan set.[3]
The earliest image of a musical ensemble is found on the 8th century Borobudur temple, Central Java. Musical instruments such as the bamboo flute, bells, drums in various sizes, lute, and bowed and plucked string instruments were identified in this image. However it lacks metallophones and xylophones. Nevertheless, the image of this musical ensemble is suggested to be the ancient form of the gamelan.
In the palaces of Java are the oldest known ensembles, the Munggang and Kodokngorek gamelans, apparently from the 12th century. These formed the basis of a "loud style". A different, "soft style" developed out of the kemanak tradition and is related to the traditions of singing Javanese poetry, in a manner which is often believed to be similar to performance of modern bedhaya dance. In the 17th century, these loud and soft styles mixed, and to a large extent the variety of modern gamelan styles of Bali, Java, and Sunda resulted from different ways of mixing these elements. Thus, despite the seeming diversity of styles, many of the same theoretical concepts, instruments, and techniques are shared between the styles.[4]

Watch Gamelan performances by part 5 students (April 2010) of TESL UiTM Shah Alam!

Click here!